News

Don’t forget, you can pick up a copy of The Ashtead & Leatherhead Local magazine from Ashtead and Leatherhead libraries, as well as the customer service desk of Sainsbury’s Leatherhead.


WHAT'S GOING ON IN JUNE? Click here...

ASHTEAD COMMUNITY VISION, AT LAST WE'VE FINSIHED - OR HAVE WE?

A big thank-you to all of the four thousand seven hundred of you who voted in the referendum on May 4th for the Ashtead Neighbourhood Development Plan (NDP). The NDP was approved by a massive 92%, with almost all those voting in the SCC election also giving us their views on our plan.

A special meeting of Mole Valley District Council will be held before the end of May to formally adopt our policies as part of their planning policy and make them a first point of reference when considering future planning applications in Ashtead.

Does this mean that the work of the Neighbourhood Forum is complete?

After such a long period developing the plan, it is very tempting to file all the paperwork and have a rest. However housing is a continuing issue and there are a number of things that we need to keep an eye on:

Now that we have these policies, we need to monitor the results to ensure that they deliver what we intended.

Mole Valley District Council is in the process of developing a new Local Plan. At this point in time, we do not expect that anything in that plan will affect what we have agreed. However, we still need to review elements of that plan as they are published. The next element will be the Strategic Issues and Options for Consultation, planned for June this year.

The government is consulting on future house-building with the publication of a White Paper titled “Fixing Our Broken Housing Market”. This discusses the options for encouraging local councils to be more ambitious in their development plans and for streamlining the planning process for developers.

We will certainly be having a bit of a rest, so these articles will become more sporadic. When something significant crops up, we will let you know through these pages.

Our thanks go to Zen for providing this platform to communicate our news and views to you all. Finally thanks again for all of those who voted on the plan, both for and against.

You can read or download the Ashtead Neighbourhood Development Plan on the Ashtead Community Vision (ACV) website at: www.ashteadcommunityvision.org.uk/ or read a printed copy at Ashtead Library. Tony Tuley


CONTINUED LIFE-SAVING TRAINING FOR MOLE VALLEY RESIDENTS.

Over 60 residents received potentially life-saving Emergency Life Support skills training at courses held in Beare Green, Pixham Lane and Ashtead at the end of April. Free-to-attend Heartstart courses are being run across the district thanks to partnership work between British Heart Foundation (BHF), the Ambulance service and Mole Valley District Council.

The three courses, which included training 24 young people aged between 10 and 15 year olds at Beare Green Youth Club, educated participants in how to assess a casualty, place them in the recovery position and, if necessary, carry out CPR. The course also covered key differences between a Heart Attack and a Sudden Cardiac Arrest, in addition to teaching the importance of how to use a defibrillator. Since 2015, over 750 residents have received potentially life-saving training and nearly 40 defibrillators have been installed across Mole Valley, including three defibrillators having been recently donated to Mole Valley District Council (MVDC) by Gatwick Airport via the South East Coast Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust (SECAMB).

More Heartstart courses and defibrillator installations are being planned over the coming months across Mole Valley. For more information about the Public Access Defibrillator nearest to you and the next available free training courses in your area, please visit www.molevalley.gov.uk/heartstart.

Murray Clark, one of the volunteer BHF Heartstart trainers, said: “It is vitally important for people of all ages to receive this training – simple skills can save lives. We are developing further training in keeping with the BHF’s aim to create a future ‘Nation of Lifesavers’. If a trained bystander were able to use a defibrillator within 3-5 minutes of a collapse, the victim’s survival rate can double or even triple.”

Corporate Head of Service at MVDC, Rachel O’Reilly, said: “As part of our ongoing commitment to maintaining the health and wellbeing of our residents, we are delighted to continue working with our partners to offer residents the opportunity to take this training and provide more defibrillators in the district. Hopefully you will never need to put the skills from the training into practise, but it is important to have that knowledge in case someone needs your help in the future.”


CARERS' WEEK: WHO CARES FOR THE CARERS?

Carers’ Week is an annual awareness event highlighting the challenges carers face. This year’s campaign runs from 12th to 18th June and focuses on Building Carer Friendly Communities: ‘places that understand a carer’s daily reality and do what they can to make life a little bit easier for them.’

The facts:

· Three out of five of us will become a carer at some point.
· Around 6.5 million people in the UK provide unpaid care for a disabled, ill or older relative or friend. · At least 380,000 older carers in England provide 50+ hours of care a week without any help from their local authority; over 100,000 are in their eighties and beyond.
· Many carers are unaware of the support and financial help they’re entitled to.
“We know that caring for a loved one can be a rewarding experience, but without the right support at the right time, caring can also have a huge impact on a carer’s emotional and physical health, work and finances,” says Heléna Herklots CBE, Chief Executive of charity Carers UK.
Research shows that caring can isolate carers and potentially damage their physical and mental health and their relationships. It can also make it difficult to hold down a job, even driving them into poverty.

ARE YOU A HIDDEN CARER?

“Please don’t call me a carer - I don’t want that title. I am her son, not a carer!”

“I pop in to my neighbour every day and do all her shopping and cleaning for her, but I am not her carer. They go in to get her up and washed.”

These responses, gathered by a recent campaign to identify ‘hidden’ carers, highlight a common problem. Many carers don’t see themselves as carers if they don’t help someone dress, take medication, move about or go to the loo - or if they’re ‘just’ a husband, wife, parent, son, daughter, friend etc. Yet helping with shopping, laundry, cleaning, cooking, form-filling or money management is all part of caring, and caring is caring - whoever it’s for.

BUILDING CARER FRIENDLY COMMUNITIES

Carers say that support and awareness in their community make a positive difference. The Carers’ Week campaign wants us to raise awareness in schools and organisations; recommend carer-friendly organisations, services and businesses; and pledge to make our own organisations carer-friendly. If you’re an employer, this could include giving carer employees:

· An extended lunch hour, giving them time to eat and check on the person they care for.
· Flexibility to work more when they can, while allowing time off for appointments and adapting start/finish times etc.

SOURCES OF SUPPORT FOR CARERS

Help is available, but can be hard to find. The NHS Choice Care Page www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/Pages/what-is-social-care These eight charities support Carers Week. Services they offer include counselling, practical and financial help, respite care and advice.




MARIE CURIE IS COUNTING ON YOUR CUPPA!

Host a Blooming Great Tea Party 23rd-25th June. Marie Curie is calling on people to hold a Blooming Great Tea Party in aid of the charity this June.

From Friday 23rd - Saturday 25th June, Marie Curie is encouraging people to get together with friends, family and colleagues to host a tea party at home, bake sale at work or special tea break at your social group to raise funds. The money raised will help Marie Curie provide vital care and support for people living with a terminal illness, and their families.

Emily Akeroyd, Marie Curie Community Fundraiser in West Surrey said: “Holding a Blooming Great Tea Party really is a piece of cake. Just pick a date, send out some invites and enjoy some tea and cake between 23rd- 25th June. You can choose to make everything yourself or pop to the shops for some tasty treats, as long as you price each slice or put a donation box by the front door you’ll be sure to raise funds to help Marie Curie support people when they need it most.”

To find out more and receive your free fundraising pack, call 0800 716 146 or visit www.mariecurie.org.uk/teaparty


JACK AND THE BEANSTALK LEATHERHEAD PANTO AUDITION SATURDAY 29TH JULY.

(Registration 10.30am - auditions start 11am for approx 1½ hours)

Following last year’s very successful and well received 'Beauty and the Beast', we have been invited to return for our second year to produce another fantastic pantomime at the Leatherhead Theatre. After doubling audience numbers last year we hope to build on our amazing reviews and get more people to return to the Leatherhead Panto!

To register your interest for the audition, email your name and date of birth to info@lp-creatives.com with the subject title: ‘Leatherhead Panto’, no tel calls please.

All candidates (children need to be aged between 7 – 15 years on 1st September 2017) should wear comfortable (and suitable) shoes and clothing and be prepared to dance on their own as well as part of a group. Candidates must have good dance skills and a strong stage presence. Singing and drama experience is desirable but not essential - however a big smile and plenty of enthusiasm is!


NATIONAL TRUST TO HOST EXHIBITION REMEMBERING THE GREAT STORM AT LEITH HILL.

Fridays/Saturdays/Sundays 6th-29th October

The National Trust at Leith Hill is planning to mark the 30th anniversary of the Great Storm this autumn with a photographic exhibition showing the damage caused at this famous Surrey landmark. Leith Hill, one of the highest points of Surrey was devastated by the hurricane-force winds which resulted in the loss of hundreds of trees, many of which were veteran specimens.

As violent as the storm was, no serious damage was sustained to people or buildings at Leith Hill and the effects of the deforestation presented the rangers caring for the hill with some unique opportunities. Modern-day Leith Hill ranger, Sophie Parker says “The change to the landscape was monumental but over time nature has restored the damage”. She continues “in areas of Leith Hill new trees and shrubs were planted to replace the fallen ones. In other areas, we simply left the upturned trees and allowed nature to take control again”.

Sophie and her colleagues are collating accounts and photographs of the Great Storm from locals and would be delighted to hear from readers who are willing to share their photographs and memorabilia for use in the exhibition.

The Great Storm; 30 Years On will be open to visitors on

Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 6 October until 29 October at Leith Hill Place from 11am until 5pm. If you have photographs and/or memorabilia that you would like to loan to the National Trust for this exhibition, please email surreyhills@nationaltrust.org.uk


NATIONAL TRUST TO HOST EXHIBITION REMEMBERING THE GREAT STORM AT LEITH HILL.

Fridays/Saturdays/Sundays 6th-29th October

The National Trust at Leith Hill is planning to mark the 30th anniversary of the Great Storm this autumn with a photographic exhibition showing the damage caused at this famous Surrey landmark. Leith Hill, one of the highest points of Surrey was devastated by the hurricane-force winds which resulted in the loss of hundreds of trees, many of which were veteran specimens.

As violent as the storm was, no serious damage was sustained to people or buildings at Leith Hill and the effects of the deforestation presented the rangers caring for the hill with some unique opportunities. Modern-day Leith Hill ranger, Sophie Parker says “The change to the landscape was monumental but over time nature has restored the damage”. She continues “in areas of Leith Hill new trees and shrubs were planted to replace the fallen ones. In other areas, we simply left the upturned trees and allowed nature to take control again”.

Sophie and her colleagues are collating accounts and photographs of the Great Storm from locals and would be delighted to hear from readers who are willing to share their photographs and memorabilia for use in the exhibition.

The Great Storm; 30 Years On will be open to visitors on

Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 6 October until 29 October at Leith Hill Place from 11am until 5pm. If you have photographs and/or memorabilia that you would like to loan to the National Trust for this exhibition, please email surreyhills@nationaltrust.org.uk